Dear Students,
The Symposium will take place from October 15 to 18, 2012 at the Fields Institute.
All talks are tailored to those generally interested in mathematics.
Public Opening Ceremony of the Fields Medal Symposium
October 15, 2012, 7PM-9PM
Pre-reception for students: Hart House Music Room (5PM-6:30PM)
Registration (free, but required): http://fmsopening.eventbrite.com
Special Program for Students
October 16, 2012, 7PM-9PM
Pre-reception for students: Fields Institute’s Stewart Library (5:45PM – 7PM)
Registration (free, but required): http://fmsstudentprgm.eventbrite.com
Questions may be asked live via Twitter, https://twitter.com/FieldsMedalSymp
Note: If we reach capacity, we will set up overflow rooms but you can also watch online by following the webcasts. The link for two special events’ webcasts can be found by following the More Info links.
Also to note: The Scientific portion of the Symposium can be watched live, here http://www.fields.utoronto.ca/live. Unfortunately you only have the option of watching it live since the archived videos will not be immediately posted.
You can also follow us online by
The blog and Twitter account will be updated several times each day of the symposium on relevant topics to the talks taking place. Please leave comments there relevant to the material.
Program Summary
The Fields Medal is the highest prize in mathematics, established in 1932 by UofT Professor J.C. Fields. It is not a lifetime achievement award like the Nobel Prizes, but it was established to encourage mathematicians, under the age of 40, to continue paving the way for new mathematical ideas.
Ngô Bào Châu is one of the Fields Medalists awarded at the 2010 International Congress  of Mathematicians. The Inaugural Fields Medal Symposium will be hosted at the Fields Institute to celebrate and extend Ngô’s research.
Ngô won the medal for proving the Fundamental Lemma of the Langlands Program using brilliant geometric ideas. Ngô’s work is built on ideas of UofT Professor James Arthur’s mathematical work in the program. The overarching goal of the Langlands Program is to unite many different areas of mathematics.
The inaugural Fields Medal Symposium has been organized as a celebration of these mathematical ideas with the hope that the next generation of mathematicians will be motivated to explore these questions. We are hosting talks by the world’s leading experts in Number Theory, Representation Theory, Algebraic Geometry,  and Mathematical Physics.  This includes one of the  recipients of the $3M Fundamental Physics Prize, Edward Witten of the Institute
for Advanced Study.
All talks are tailored for students and young scientists interested in surveying ideas of general mathematical interest.
The October 16 panel discussion featuring many prominent mathematicians will be hosted at the institute, specifically for high school and undergraduate students (but all are invited). The discussion will be preceded by two talks that give context to the topics of the panel. Another feature of this year’s symposium is a public ceremony featuring talks by Ngô and UofT Professor James Arthur. The symposium activities will also be webcasted  online for viewers around the globe.
The Fields Medal Symposium is being inaugurated by Director of the Fields Institute and UofT Professor Edward Bierstone. The symposium has secured sponsorship from Great West Life as a Gold Level Sponsor and James Stewart as a Silver Level Sponsor. The institute will continue to host the symposium series on an annual basis.
Hope to see you there,
Fields Institute

Organizational Meeting on Graduate Courses offered at Fields Inst. this semester:

Thematic Program on Forcing and its Applications

Wednesday, September 12, 2012, 12:30 p.m., Fields Institute, 222 College St.

Graduate courses (starting the week of Sept. 17)

Course on Forcing Alan Dow (UNC Charolette)
Tentatively Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Stewart Library
This will be a basic Forcing course directed towards graduate students and non-experts which will still reach a reasonable level of sophistication in designing forcing notions. An emphasis will be placed on examples and on the methodology of designing the forcings themselves rather than the formal and rigorous development of the logical underpinnings of forcing.

Course on Large Cardinals
Paul Larson (Miami University)
Tentatively Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Stewart Library
Large cardinal axioms, also known as the axioms of the higher infinite, posit cardinals that prescribe their own transcendence over smaller cardinals and provide a superstructure for the analysis of strong propositions in set theory. They form an essentially linear hierarchy reaching up to inconsistent extensions of motivating concepts. This course will focus on the most fundamental large cardinal notions, emphasizing their inter-relationship with combinatorics and with forcing techniques.

,
Dear Students,

On behalf of the Fields Undergraduate Network and the Canadian
Mathematical Society's Student Committee, I would like to invite
you to four math events that are being held this Friday.

Lecture by Professor Craig G. Fraser on the
History of Complex Analysis,
10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (James Room)

Lunch with Professor Fraser at Richtree (444 Yonge Street),
12:15 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Panel Discussion on the Role of Mathematics in Industry,
2:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. (Windsor Room)

CV Writing Workshop (pre-register here,
http://cms.math.ca/Events/winter11/student_workshop),
4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. (James Room)

All events (except lunch) take place at the Delta Chelsea Hotel,
which is located at 33 Gerrard Street.

If you'd like to come to lunch, please RSVP by this Thursday at
noon to richard.cerezo@alumni.utoronto.ca

Lastly, please follow the links below to see posters for the events,

Lecutre on the Origins of Complex Analysis Poster
(http://www.flickr.com/photos/63196321@N07/6461977219/in/photostream/lightbox/)
Panel Discussion and CV Workshop Poster
(http://www.flickr.com/photos/63196321@N07/6461976291/in/photostream/lightbox/)

Sincerely,
Richard Cerezo
richard.cerezo@alumni.utoronto.ca
, , , ,
July 22, 2011 - DISCRETE MATHEMATICS at Carleton University
Organizers: David Thomson (Carleton), Michelle Kovesi (Carleton, and
Richard Cerezo (Fields)

August 19, 2011 - STUDENT PRESENTATIONS FROM FIELDS-MITACS SUMMER
UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROGRAM at the Fields Institute
Organizers: University of Toronto Math Union, UTM Mathematics and
Computer Science Society

September 2011 - KNOT THEORY at the University of Waterloo
Organizer: University of Waterloo Pure Math Club

October 28-30, 2011 - RISK FORUM at the University of Toronto
Organizers: University of Toronto, University of Waterloo,
Ryerson University. More TBA

November 2011 - ALGEBRAIC GEOMETRY at Queen's University
Organizer: Queen's University Math Student Council

December 10-12, 2011 - 2011 CMS WINTER MEETING at the Delta Chelsea
Hotel, Downtown Toronto
Organizers: FUN Executive Team, CMS Student Committee

January 2012 - SEMINARS IN UNDERGRADUATE MATHEMATICS IN MONTREAL
Organizer: Seminars in Undergraduate Mathematics in Montreal Executive Team

For more information, visit blog.fields.utoronto.ca/fun
or email Richard Cerezo at rcerezo@fields.utoronto.ca
, ,
MMF-AIMA Canada present:
What Graduates Need to Know About the Canadian Hedge Fund Industry

The MMF program and AIMA Canada are proud to present a panel discussion
and networking event on the Canadian hedge fund industry.

Participants from Picton Mahoney Asset Management, Waratah Advisors,
Arrow Capital Inc., Scotia Capital Inc. - Prime Finance,
UTAM (University of Toronto Asset Management) and other firms will
be participating and attending.

Topic: What graduates need to know about the Canadian hedge fund
industry to succeed - as told by industry insiders.

Date: Tuesday, July 19, 2011
Time: 4:00 - 4:30 pm Registration
4:30 - 6:00 pm Panel discussion
6:00 - 7:00 pm Reception and networking

Location: Fields Institute
222 College Street
Toronto, Ontario
M5T 3J1 Canada
, ,
Dear All,

We are running a workshop on mathematics and oceanography at the
Fields Institute on June 13 - 16, 2011. The purpose is to bring
together mathematicians and ocean scientists to confer on the
present state of research and the current body of knowledge
on ocean dynamics, and in particular on tsunami predictions
and the dynamics of rogue waves.  There is a sense of urgency
in the ocean sciences and the mathematics
communities over these questions, due to the very recent tsunami
disaster in Japan.
Our purpose is to inform the mathematics community about problems
of prediction and of description of extreme ocean waves, and
in particular the role that can be
played by mathematical tools and techniques. As well, our purpose
is to provide a venue from which collaborations are developed
between the two communities of mathematicians and ocean scientists.

You are all welcome to attend the workshop, which has no
registration fee. More information is available at the Fields
Institute website:

http://www.fields.utoronto.ca/programs/scientific/10-11/seawaves/ <http://www.fields.utoronto.ca/programs/scientific/10-11/seawaves/>

  Hoping to see you there,
          Walter and Catherine
, ,
The Fields Undergraduate Network (FUN) organizes
monthly meetings to explore different areas of mathematical
research. The theme as well as the host university will vary from
month to month.  All interested undergraduates and graduates
are welcome to attend.  We especially encourage participation by
members of student math societies.

For more information, please visit our website, or contact
Richard Cerezo (rcerezo@fields.utoronto.ca).

RESEARCH IN NUMBER THEORY WORKSHOP
Saturday, March 5, 2011
Koffler House (KP108)
569 Spadina Avenue, University of Toronto

ORGANIZERS Richard Cerezo and Sergio Da Silva (Toronto)

SCHEDULE
10:00 a.m. Networking
10:30 a.m. Question period with Hugh Williams (Calgary)
11:00 a.m. Hugh Williams, University of Calgary
           What Keeps Our Secrets Safe?
12:00 p.m. Lunch
1:30 p.m.  Henry Kim, University of Toronto
           The Role of L-functions in Number Theory
2:30 p.m.  Panel Discussion
3:00 - 4:00 p.m.  Leo Goldmakher, University of Toronto
                Ergodic Approaches to Number Theory

Register on-site or online.
Please visit: www.fields.utoronto.ca/programs/outreach/10-11/undergradnet
, ,

 

Jeremy Quastel will be teaching a new graduate course

"Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation from particle systems"

Mondays 1-3 in Rm 210, Fields Institute.  Starting Mar 7.

The course is a part of the activities related to  Fields Institute
Thematic Program  "Dynamics and Transport in Disordered Systems".
, ,